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Queenscliffe Historical Museum

Nestled between the Post Office and Library at Hesse Street in Queenscliff, Queenscliffe Historical Museum holds a collection of nearly 20,000 items illustrating the history of Queenscliff and Point Lonsdale region. The name ‘Queenscliffe’, may raise many eyebrows, but it is the name of the Borough which includes Queenscliff, Swan Island and Point Lonsdale.  Queenscliffe Historical Museum was officially opened on 28 April 1974 by then Premier of Victoria, Rupert Hamer. The Museum is managed by Museum Australia (Victoria)

Governor of Victoria, Her Excellency the Honourable Linda Dessau AM, unveiled a sculpture of Lieutenant-Governor Charles La Trobe at the Museum compound on Saturday 5 March 2016. The Plaque beneath the bust reads,

“LA TROBE IN QUEENSCLIFF

CHARLES JOSEPH LA TROBE, SUPERINTEND OF PORT PHILLP DISTRICT OF NSW FROM 1839 AND LIEUTENANT – GOVERNOR OF THE COLONY OF VICTORIA AFTER SEPARATION IN 1851, VISITED BALLARINE PENINSULA FREQUENTLY FROM FEBRUARY 1840 UNTIL HE LEFT IN 1854.

IN 1844, HE BUILT A COTTAGE AT SHORTLAND BLUFF, LATER QUEENSCLIFF.

LA TROBE SELECTED SHORTLAND BLUFF FOR A LIGHT HOUSE AT THE HEADS AND WAS PRESENT WHEN IT BEGAN OPERATING IN APRIL 1843.

ON 22 JUNE 1853 LA TROBE RENAMED SHORTLAND BLUFF QUEENSCLIFF IN HONOUR OF QUEEN VICTORIA. THE BOROUGH OF QUEENSCLIFFE WAS PROCLAIMED ON 12 MAY 1863.

THE BUST OF LA TROBE WAS FUNDED BY PUBLIC SUBSCRIPTION TO THE QUEENSCLIFFE HISTORICAL MUSEUM INC. AND GIFTED TO THE COMMUNITY.

UNVEILED 5 MARCH 2016 BY HER EXCELLENCY LINDA DESSAU AM

GOVERNOR OF VICTORIA

SCULPTURE PETER CORLETTE OAM”

Details

 

Location: 49 Hesse Street, Queenscliff, VIC. 3225

Ph. (03) 5258 2511

Opening Hours

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday: 11am – 4pm

Saturday and Sunday: 1pm – 4pm

Web: http://www.historyofqueenscliffe.com

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    • #7375
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      Nestled between the Post Office and Library at Hesse Street in Queenscliff, Queenscliffe Historical Museum holds a collection of nearly 20,000 items i
      [See the full post at: Queenscliffe Historical Museum]

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    • #7380
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      Unveiling of Charles La Trobe Bust at Queenscliffe Historical Museum. A part of Governor’s speech

      When it comes to La Trobe’s significant connection with the office I am now privileged to hold, it is well known that, in 1839, La Trobe was sent by Queen Victoria to Melbourne (known then as the Port Phillip District), where he served as Superintendent until 1851.

      He then became the Lieutenant-Governor of Victoria from 1851-1854, Victoria still falling under NSW jurisdiction until it was able to establish and maintain its own government.

      The story of his voyage to Melbourne says so much about the time. First, the La Trobes spent a full 4 months at sea, before arriving in Sydney. They waited there then for 2 months, before another ship could sail for Port Phillip.

      When the La Trobes finally arrived, 6 months having passed since they had left England, the weather was too stormy to allow Mrs La Trobe to disembark. She had to wait on board the ship for another three days before she and the family could finally be rowed up river to Melbourne. After that, she still had to wade through muddy and unmade streets before arriving at her ultimate destination.

      We cannot imagine how a 29-year-old French-Swiss noblewoman, married only 4 years, might have felt (I was older and wiser and travelled only some 10 minutes down St Kilda Road when I recently moved into Government House: that was daunting enough!).

      Mind you, I was ‘of a certain age’ too when I became Governor. For his part, Superintendent La Trobe was of a certain very much younger age at just 38!

      The young La Trobe, who had none of the traditional experience for the role – neither military nor administrative – was, according to biographer Washington Irving: ‘… a man of a thousand occupations; a botanist, a geologist, a hunter of beetles and butterflies, a musical amateur, a sketcher of no mean pretensions; in short, a complete virtuoso; added to which he was a very indefatigable, if not always a very successful, sportsman.’

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